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About David J. James

48 year old accountant who loves languages, literature, history, religion, politics, internet, vlogging and blogging and lively written discussion. Conservative Christian, married to an angel, we have three kiddiwinkies, and live in Warsaw, Poland. I also work in Prague, Czech Republic and Bratislava, Slovakia.

Posted on July 23, 2011, in Blog only, Default or Miscellaneous, Other, Politics, Reblogs from other bloggers and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 13 Comments.

  1. I was just outside of Oslo when this stuff happened. I remember an acquaintance of mine talking on the phone with a terrified expression, then hanging up, turning to us, saying simply: “the parliament quarter is bombed!” A bit later, two people I know came back from the centre, where they were actually supposed to have been right by the bombing site, but they luckily took their time getting there, and were instead in a kiosk that had its windows cracked by the explosion.

    Then someone talked about some shooting on an island, but it never occurred to me that it would have anything to do with the bombing, except maybe some madman/-men jumping on the chance when everybody was busy with something else. With the scarce population, murders are not that common in Norway, although they do happen. Recently, in Oslo there have unfortunately been more people stabbed to death than before, but I don’t know if they are “inspired” by this massacre.

    At first I heard there were “some” victims, most of them wounded, so I thought it hadn’t lasted long. Then, when I returned to my apartment in Oslo, I went online and found that the actual number of victims was higher than anything I could have imagined. So many killed in one place in Norway has been unheard of since World War II.

    I didn’t personally know anyone on Utøya, but I have met one of those who were killed. Back in my political days (high school, basically), I attended a meeting where he gave a speech, and we shook hands and participated in a game together afterwards. Although I didn’t really know him, it was sad to see his name on the list of the victims. A former classmate of mine was supposed to be on the island that day, but she luckily stayed at home.

    Many have called this guy a “Christian Terrorist”, I disagree with this for at least three big reasons: 1. His actions go against the teachings of Christ (not to mention that “ye shall know them by their fruits”). 2. His idea of “Christianity” was a cultural one; he wrote in his manifesto that he does not have any personal relationship with God, but that he is ethnically from a Christian part of the world. 3. His weapons were named after those of the pagan Norse gods Thor and Odin.

    You can also see this guy’s take on it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lKEqM5bi8K4&feature=plcp&context=C4e29928VDvjVQa1PpcFPuQafGh161knKc9CfHxUTuXR0HhkYvFgI=

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    • A number of the killings done in this style in recent history were done by “Christians” who were actually Freemasons. Whether it is because they have contact with a Satanic organisation and get possessed or whether it is because that organisation simply intrinsically appeals to the mentality of people who think they have a right to prosper at the expense of others they see as less important than themselves (sociophobes and psychopaths, in other words) is anyone’s guess, I suppose.

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      • It could even be both. I haven’t thought much about it, but if one has an idea of being “above” the average person, then “secret clubs” or non-transparent organizations would probably be more attractive.

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        • How is it possible to distinguish between mental derangement and satanic possession ? Is the killer of John Lennon possessed or just plain mad. He claims to have been told by voices in his head to kill Lennon. Surely this “voice” was his own psychotic auto-suggestion coming into play together with his deranged beliefs that he could achieve fame for himself by the removal of Lennon.
          I suppose what I am querying is the difference between sociophobes, psychopaths and the demonically possessed ? Do they not all come under the category of mental derangement / abnormality ?

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          • I am by no means an expert, and as far as I know, I may never have met either demon possessed nor psychopats. I’d say the difference is that those possessed by demons are possessed by demons, while others are not. I don’t know how common possession is, though.

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            • Probably possession in the way it was known in earlier times is less common as there are less of them to go around a population of 7 billion people.

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              • I think you’re right. Since Jesus said that the widow who had been married to the each of the seven brothers wouldn’t belong to any of them in the afterlife because nobody there gets married but are like the angels of heaven, I take it demons also don’t reproduce.

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                • That’s how I understand it. So about one third of the angels fell with Lucifer, meaning that they are outnumbered anyhow 2 to 1 with the “ministering spirits sent forth to minister to the heirs of salvation” as the word puts it. But consider this – if the population of the world in the three years of our Lord’s ministry was about 350 million then we have today twenty times the number of people that there were at that time. That should make the possibility of possession a twentieth of what it was then, per person. I don’t think that infinite numbers of angels were created, the Bible rarely speaks in terms of more than that for the heavenly host. Daniel speaks of ten thousand times ten thousand. That would be one hundred million good angels and therefore fifty million fallen angels. That gives us one fallen angel per 140 people. That’s just an estimate of course, and I have no way of knowing whether they are alike in power and influence. There may well be those among them who can handle a much bigger catchment area than that, and there will be those who can’t even do justice to a territory of 140. It’s a bit like with salesmen, I expect.

                  Now, about one in ten people suffer at some time or other from some form of mental illness and I imagine that many a demon could sort that result out among his theoretical allotment of 140 people. However, it’s not necessarily the case that the mental illness is always from the devil, and even when it is I don’t suppose that full-scale possession is needed.

                  I think that the strategy has been that seeing that the devil has limited resources while the flourishing of mankind has resulted in continual growth of populations, that he has concentrated on where the power is, making his play first and foremost to thiose who have power, or who can be primed to get it. He does his Faustian deals with those who will end up in charge of others, and he uses the Masonic and other organisations as the organ for this control of power in the earth.

                  Anyone who plays about with it is to be pitied. It is an easily way to the top but the price is far more than the people who are in it realise. These people who now are going to Bilderberg conferences and blithely gloating in the secrecy of their souls of how they are sitting pretty with their club and determining the fates of their fellow mortals, as they sip on the finest beverages and partake of dainty morsels, they will be those who cry from the pit that Abraham should send Lazarus to their brothers, and warn them – when in fact there are no shortage of warnings for them already, had they but ears to hear them.

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          • It’s a very good question. Christians are not immune from mental illness – it is a feature of modern times and also people with conditions which are based on the physiological state of the brain are not necessarily healed or immune because of their faith. However, where there is no observable causal affect for the mental illness and yet the person does these things, then possession remains a possible explanation. Given the increase in the instance of serious mental disorders among people who have to do with Satanic matters such as Masonry or the Watchtower organisation they spawned, there does seem to be some coefficient although whether the causality is that they are sick because they follow the devil or they follow the devil because they are sick is something which would be hard to prove objectively. Christian theology is probably satisfied either way.

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  2. I share Bruno’s view. If human beings are to advance spiritually then we must all learn to empathise and show compassion and realise that we all essentially seek the same thing. To be respected and to be free from other’s aggression. As long as we continue to belong to any sort of gathering (club) that sees itself as different from and superior to other groupings then man’s inhumanity to man will continue forever (however long remains). This doesn’t mean we must be unthinking clones but we must be able to disagree without losing respect and compassion for those we disagree with.

    Just an observation on Everett’s comment about ceremonies and rituals. It seems we are “hardwired” to need some form of ritual and ceremony in our lives. It only becomes damaging when the underlying belief represented by the ritual does not accord with compassion and denies to others the life-affirming gifts ( freely provided by nature; God; universal life force or however else we view that which we cannot understand or analyse). I think that is what Everett means by VAIN ceremonies and rituals.

    I am not an adherent to Christianity or Buddhism, but, to me,the teachings of Jesus and Buddha seem uncannily sensible and compassionate and if, on an individual basis, we could all try to follow even a fraction of what they taught, then perhaps human understanding and spirituality would take a quantum leap.
    We do not need to join clubs; we only need to read the words of these two great teachers and put them into practice. Easier said than done but not a reason not to try.

    With respect to all
    pekadewa.

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  3. I feel a very huge sadness… Its hard to believe that someone can be so inhuman, he has not any capacity of empathy! The goal never justifies inhumanity…never justifies lack of compassion, of empathy! There are no words to describe the sadness he caused.. Bruno

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  4. These people officiated at my grandfather’s funeral. They wear the regalia of this world, and claim to follow the truth, but their esoteric social club is an abomination to God. When will they seek the Grand Architect of their souls and forsake their vain ceremonies and rituals?

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    • Thanks for that, Everett. Many of them are honestly misguided, but at the higher levels I understand it is all very sinister and concerned entirely with supporting the god of this world. And as you rightly say, an abomination to God. Very sadly some people have blamed his views on being a “Christian”, but no true Christian will become a freemason. Even the ceremony of coming from darkness into light is inappropriate for someone who is a Christian – they are denying their salvation as they go through the form of words necessary to be even only in the first degree.

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