Category Archives: In Other Languages

Presented in or using other languages than English

St David’s Day


This is fresh off the press of my video camera, filmed less than one hour before publication, which is good for me as may play out backlog has been at times slightly over one year and right now is about 8 months long, but still I think (and in this I have been guided by some of the regular viewers on YT and some of my dear subbers on here who told me so in comments) that it’s good to let topical stuff jump to the front of the queue. I don’t say the best stuff – that would mean I would have a lot of less good stuff waiting to come and that would end up being a bit demotivating for me and you also, but thankfully there’s a lot of my best ever stuff in the backlog waiting its turn patiently, however topical stuff deserves to come to the front of the line regardless of quality.

In the past I have done St David’s Day videos and the best of them in the mind of the viewer, assuming that comments and ratings are an accurate reflection, is the first I did, which is:

A number of viewers stated that they were even in tears or a family member was in tears listening to it. I don’t know what better compliment can be paid to a rendition. Assuming they were the right kind of tears, of course…

The Myfanwy one was from 2007 and since then I had an almost unbroken track record of St David’s Day videos.

Here’s Huli again doing the 2008 one:

And as you can see, facial fungus appears on this one.

The beard, which for some years I wore from Christmas to Easter, also appears in the 2009 one:

being not the best ever rendition of Hopcyn’s “Bugeilio’r gwenith gwyn“.

The fungus is still in evidence in the 2010 video:

However in the 2011 video there is none. That is not only because I didn’t grow a beard in winter that year, but also because I didn’t do a St David’s day video – I was busy and forgot about it.

However, in 2012, last year (again no beard at all last winter) I made up for lost time by putting up a rendition of music that you won’t hear anywhere else on the internet, and which I may possess the last copy of in sheet music, namely Cartref. Like most of the St David’s Day videos, this is sung “a capulco” as Huli puts it.

Here it is:

Which brings us back to the current one, the sixth one, in the course seven years.

Why is it important to me to do a St David’s Day video? Do I believe in Saints in the Roman Catholic sense of the word? Absolutely not. Do I regard myself as linked in some way, being called David, with that David? Well in fact that is what I was told I was named for – the name had been in my family and various grandparents in the male line were Dafydd and you didn’t need to go far back before you got to people in that line who never knew a word of English. But I really know very little about him and much prefer to identify with the Old Testament David who wrote Psalms, played music, admired women, killed Philistines, put up with Saul’s persecution, built cities and was a man after God’s own heart. He doesn’t get aday in the calendar though, which smacks of anti-semitism to me.

No, the reason why I think is this – partly to take the opportunity to celebrate Welshness and being part Welsh, and the other part is that it’s a bit like an anniversary. I joined YT and started to put up my first faltering videos in February 2006 but the beginning was so faltering you could say it was a couple of months before it got off the ground and so treating the end rather than the middle of February as the Anniversary of being on YT seems fairer. It’s now 1st March 2013, that’s 7 years of me being active on YT, and active I am as I have over 1500 videos, on average 200 a year although one year I went over 300 in that year.

I have found that doing video and sharing experiences with a kindly (and sometimes unkindly, but never mind) audience adds an extra dimension to the experience of anything. On the one hand I take the video to have a memory of my own, but the impetus to keep going and keep it organised is better when it is going to be published and others enjoy it.

Before video, I used to travel like I do now but when I think back and see the difference between the things I did before YT and after YT – I simply remember the post YT stuff better, much better, and the experiences don’t all blur into one in my mind. Also it makes me want to get out there and make the film, rather than do the airport-taxi-hotel-office-hotel-taxi-airport cycle of work without seeing anything. There are so many well-travelled businessmen who have nothing to show for all the places they have been. They have been to major capitals of the world but they haven’t even walked around on the streets and heard the language or tasted the local food or seen the individual sights. Just international looking hotels, airports and offices. I was one such person and decided it was a waste, I wasn’t gonna do it anymore, and that even if my own descendants don’t watch to find out what great grandaddy’s life was like (I don’t see why they should) at least I have the record for my own satisfaction. The surprise was, however, that so many more people liked it and were ready to subscribe and follow the travels time after time, such that I now feel that I know so many of these online friends and carry them with me, in a sense, on journeys, feeling them there (albeit with a time delay) when I walk with the camera switched on.

And that’s something which is definitely worth celebrating to me. So hopefully you’ve enjoyed the above mini-Eisteddfod and HSDD!

Enjoy!

Dobre pytania o goldliscie od polskiego licealisty.


Guten Tag

Guten Tag (Auch wenn einmal keinmal ist, dreimal normalerweise genuegt!)

Dzień dobry, Panie James!

Właśnie obejrzałem oba filmy wideo na temat Gold List i jestem pod ogromnym wrażeniem! Moje zeszyty są już gotowe do użycia, ale pojawiło mi się kilka pytań.

1. Metoda opiera się na krótkiej pamięci, która zanika po 2 tygodniach. Jak to możliwe, że potrafię zapomnieć, co przed chwilą komuś napisałem, a te słówka będę (w jakiejś części) pamiętać tak długi czas?

2. Czy jest to dopuszczalne, bym podczas zapisywania, tworzył pierwsze lepsze skojarzenia czy to już jest ta nauka, której w tej metodzie należy unikać?

3. Załóżmy, że wpiszę dzisiaj słowo. Po jakim czasie, średnio, zniknie ono człowiekowi z zeszytu? Pytam, ponieważ czeka mnie matura w tym roku i zastanawiam się, czy zdążę po prostu tą metodą się uczyć słówek.

Z góry dziękuję za odpowiedź, będę bardzo wdzięczny!
Jakub Wysocki

Drogi Panie Jakubie,

Oto odpowiedź na panskie trzy pytania:

1. Metoda Goldlist opiera sie na ideę, potwierzdoną praktycznym doświadczeniem już setek ludzi, że pamięć używana świadomie jest krótkofalowa, lecz istnieje też pamięć długofalowa, do której nieświadoma częsc mózgu przypisuje próbkowo wybraną część informacji, która jest mu przedstawiona.

Skoro długofalowa pamięć jest funkcją nieświadomą, nie wiemy od razu co na prawdę zostało jej przypisano, a co nie. Ale skoro krótkofalowa pamięć trwa tylko dwa tygodnia, musimy po prostu odczekać ten srok aby dowiedzieć się ex post, czego na prawdę dlugofalowo uczyliśmy się a co jednak zapomnięlismy.

Na ideach w tych zdań leży cały klucz do zrozumienia tej metody. W tym jest zawarte jej podstawa “fiziologiczna”.

Pamiętajmy jednak, że zawsze pamięc długofalowa polega na probkowaniu we własnej, nieświadomej nam gestii. Ale wielkość bądź częstotliwość tego próbkowania może być różna – jeżeli próbujemy sie uczyć na siłę, lub przez zbyteczne powtórzenia, lub bez robienia adekwatnych przerw, lub kiedy jestesmy chorzy, piani, lub przy muzyce itp, pamięć długofalowa staje się dużo mniej aktywną, i wtedy oddawa gros roboty krótkofalowej pamięci, co chcemy unikać.

2. Uczenie się przy stworzeniu na siłe tych “skojarzeń” jest typowym uczeniem się do krótkofalowej pamięci i da Panu fantastyczne wyniki poprzez 2 tygodnia, potem wielką porażkę i demotywację. Dlatego często metody opierające na tę funkcje skojarzeń oferują pieniedzy spowrotem w ciągu 16 dni, a potem nie. Oni z doświadczenia dobrze wiedzą, że nie dzialają ich metody po dwóch tygodni, ale i tak sprzedają je! Ale proszę zauważyć, ze jest wiele osób które wygrywają na konkursach pamięci, którzy jednak nie znajdują się w gronie prawdziwych poliglotów. Read the rest of this entry

What do the Jewish Feasts of Leviticus 23 really mean? (Polish and German)


Pastor Harmut Ising has sent me a bit more material to read about this film and has kindly allowed me to share it freely.

See the following pdfs. They are great studies of prophesy in the Bible, in German.

Feste des Herrn-Tab

Proph.Israel 2Tab

RL101-7 The Sibilants


Playout date: 12 November 2006
Camera: Logitech Webcam
Post Production: Windows Movie Maker – medium use
Location: Capetown Arabella Sheraton, South Africa
Other people featured: None
Genre: Lesson
Music used: “Vdol’ po ulitse metelitsa metyot” with my wife
Languages used: Russian, English
Animals featured: None

In this seventh lesson in the 10 lesson course on the Russian alphabet known as RL-101 series, we find ourselves in the Arabella Sheraton in Cape Town South Africa, with table Mountain looming behind my head. This is the perfect setting to place a new set of consonants on the table, namely the sibilants.
The problem with the sibilants as far as Cyril and Methodius and their acolytes were concerned is that that is a group of consonants which you simply would not find in either Latin or Greek. To this day these sounds present difficulties to people transcribing Russian sounds into Western European languages. So whereas the sounds that we have met until now have come from Greek into the Cyrillic alphabet, the missionaries to the Slavs had to look for another source in order to render these sounds in Slavonic.

Hebrew was the next choice, being another biblical language. The letter shin and the letter tzaddi are both sibilants in Hebrew, so they were brought in and also amended, so that from shin we derive three sibilant letters in Russian, and from tzaddi we derive two.

The words introduced in this lesson are as follows:

that .., что
borshch (beetroot soup) борщ
in (acc/prep) в
Warsaw Варшава
you (formal/plural, acc/gen) вас
Washington Вашингтон
goodbye до свидания
stomach желудок
wife жена
woman женщина
fat жир
arse жопа
hello здравствуйте
how’s it going? как дела?
how? как?
when? когда?
end конец
of course конечно
face лицо
on (acc/prep) на
because потому, что
why? почему?
Friday пятница
Tashkent Ташкент
you (inf sing, acc/gen) тебя
comrade товарищ
what? что?
spy шпион
shi (cabbage soup) щи
egg яйцо

Nowe pytania o Goldliscie


Eagle stare

Zadal mi dobre pytania cierpliwy Jacek Orzel z Nowego Saczu:

Witam. Zobaczyłem Pana filmy na YouTube o Gold List. Mam kilka pytań.
1. uczę się już angielskiego jakiś czas i znam wiele słów i czy te słowa też muszę wpisywać do czołowej listy czy już nie, znam je na tyle że ich nie zapomnę?
2. czy mogę prowadzić równocześnie dwie Gold list jedną z językiem angielskim a drugą niemieckim?
3.wszystko co mam robić to tylko napisać słówka, odczekać 2 tygodnie sprawdzić które umiem, i przepisać te których ie zapamiętałem? wiem żeby przez 2 tygodnie do nich nie zaglądać ale czy później też się ich nie uczyć tzn. nie powtarzać?
4. czy jeśli np znajdę w internecie 2000 najczęściej używanych słów w danym języku i te słowa wykorzystam to czy taka ilość pozwoli mi się swobodnie komunikować w danym języku na codzienne potrzeby? 5. lepiej będzie jeśli słówko angielskie będę pisał na zielono a polskie znaczenia na niebiesko czy obydwie kolumny na niebiesko?
6 jeśli słowo wymawia się inaczej niż pisze to wymowę mam pisać normalnie tak jak słychać czy za pomocą transkrypcji fonetycznej( np. why – łaj)
czekam na odpowiedź.

OK, dziekuje serdecznie za cierpliwosc, nareszcie sie biore do odpowiedzi na te b. dobre pytania. Przepraszam, jezeli jestem nieformalny i per “ty” mowie, ale jakos mi sie lepiej tak piszy on-line.
1. Jezeli znasz slowo, nie ma sensu dolaczyc tego do goldlistu. Zaczalbym od poczatku osobiscie tylko gdybym znal albo mniej niz 500 slow, albo mniej niz 10% swojego docelowego slownictwa. Inaczej mozna zrobic cos takiego: wziac slownik angielsko-polski, (badz cokolwiesko-polski dla tych polakow, ktore nie chca sie uczyc angielskiego lecz innego jezyka) i wtedy odnotowac (lepiej liczyc dla siebie anizeli ufac liczbe na okladce ksiazki) liczbe pozycji (slow, czy tam “entries” tak zwane) i lepiej wziac slownik kiszonkowy o jakies 20-30 tysiecy slow w jednym kierunku (ang>pol), nie wiecej.

Wtedy wez co 17ta strone i co 17ta pozycje (lub co 13. strone i co 13. pozycje albo cokolwiek co bedzie juz z gory nakladany jako algorytm) i napis te slowa – i czy znales to czy nie. Mozna tez prosic kogo innego o pomoc jezeli chcesz byc totalnie objektywnym. Wez ze 100 slow i daj sobie 1 pkt jezeli:

- znasz conamniej podstawowy zakres znaczen tego slowa, i
- umialbys to napisac bez bledow ortografycznych
- znasz gramatyczne warianty typu nieregularnych liczb mnogich oraz czasoe przeslych, itd
- umialbys to wymowic prawidlowo, napotykajac na to podczas czytania na glos.

Jezeli nawet jest elementem niepewnosci, lub gdzie myslisz ze to wszystko znasz ale nie czynnie tylko biernie, daj 1 punkt.

Jezeli mialbys blad ortograficzny, lub nie znasz czegos z podstawowych zakresu znaczen, lub nie umiesz to wymowic, ale cos tam bys pewnie zrozumial z kontekstu daj sobie pol punktu. Innymi slowami 20% do 80% wiedzy slowa to jest pol punkt, 81%-100% wiedzy to jest punkt, a mniej niz 20% jest zero. Read the rest of this entry

To Elena – the woman I love


Playout date: 2 November 2006
Camera: Fuji Finepix
Post Production: Windows Movie Maker – heavy use
Location: Various
Other people featured: My wife, Elena
Genre: Gallery type (based on photographs)
Music used: Okoldovana, ocharovana’ by St Petersburg. Aka “Dragotsennaya ty moya zhenshchina”.
Languages used: Russian
Animals featured: None

This was my 100th video, and so I wanted to mark it out in a special way, and nothing is more special to me than my wife, and therefore it was a natural thing to do to dedicate this film to her, and to show my viewers a few of the photos I’ve taken of her over the years.

The music playing in the background is one of my wife’s favourite Russian songs, by the group Sankt Peterburg. The song’s title “Dragotsennaya Ty moya zhenshchina” . This means my precious woman, so I thought it was appropriate.

This is a gallery type video intended to showcase photography, but some of these shots were done by friends.

Snow flurries


Playout date: 2 November 2006
Camera: Fuji Finepix
Post Production: None
Location: Home
Other people featured: my wife, Elena
Genre: Family, Song acapello, minimal intro
Music used: Acapello rendition of ‘Vdol’ po ulitse, aka “Snow flurries”
Languages used: Russian, English
Animals featured: None

This video was made as a response to Kenbank, one of my first subbers and a good YT friend.  Ken had made a video singing the Russian staple “snow flurries”, or “Vdol’ po ulitse metelitsa metyot”, and since on that particular morning, despite it being only 2nd November, we did indeed have snow flurries out on our terrace, I decided to sing the song a cappella, showing an example of snow flurrying, as it were, while I did it!

Title: RL101-6 The next 5 – 2/3 of the way


Playout date: 27 October 2006
Camera: Logitech Webcam
Post Production: Windows Movie Maker – heavy use
Location: Home
Other people featured: None
Genre: Lesson
Music used: I can’t help falling in love, Elvis Presley, karaoke.
Languages used: English and Russian
Animals featured: None

We look at another five letters, which is enough to take us two thirds of the way through the Russian alphabet.  That won’t mean being able to read two thirds of the words, of course, as most words are five or more letters long, and it only takes one of the these letters to be in the third not yet learned for the whole word not be readable.  However from this point on, the volume of words that we can indeed understand in full begins to increase out of proportion to the remainder of the journey.
Today’s letters are still letters deriving from Greek and not looking the same as in Latin, however these letters are also not written the same as they were in the original Greek.  That’s basically the idea of the course – back at the beginning we took a look at the six letters which are the same in Cyrillics as in the Latin alphabet we are probably familiar with ( hint – you’re reading it now) after which we looked at letters whose form in Cyrillics look like Latin letters but which sound different, and in each case they were also in Greek, and the Greek sound is basically the same as the Russian one.  We then went on to look at letters which are pretty much the same in the Cyrillic alphabet as they are in Greek, but which don’t resemble Latin letters and are therefore less likely to cause confusion.  The natural progression here is to look at the letters which really derive from Greek, but which also look slightly different to the way they looked in Greek. This will be followed by letters which derived from Hebrew instead, and then the mop up of the few letters left over at the end.  That’s basically the approach we’ve taken in this course to the Russian alphabet.

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