Category Archives: Viktor Huliganov

Viktor being Viktor

The Last Farewell


Playout date: 29 December 2006
Duration: 9:56
Views at the time added to HTV: 6,315
Likes at the time added to HTV: 21
Dislikes at time added to HTV: 43
Popularity % ” ” ” =L/(L+D): 32.8%
Comments at time added: 6
Total interactions at time added: 70
Camera: Logitech Webcam
Post Production: Windows Movie Maker – slight use
Location: Home
Other people featured: None
Genre: Intro’d song
Music used: “Last Farewell” by Roger Whittaker
Languages used: English
Animals/plants featured: None
Other remarks:

A preamble by Huliganov about the well-known Whittaker song, originally written by Ron Webster and performed by Elvis and others, but most notably by Whittaker.

The introduction refers to how the thesis of the song’s chorus stands in opposition to the Sapir Whorff hypothesis in linguistics, and also delves too deeply ito why the narrator is leaving if he loves this woman so much. To which Roger Whittaker might well respond “Mind your own business, Russky boy!”

RL101-10 Russian Alphabet


Playout date: 24 December 2006
Duration: 20:38
Views at the time added to HTV: 26,526
Likes at the time added to HTV: 182
Dislikes at time added to HTV: 9
Popularity % ” ” ” =L/(L+D): 95.3%
Comments at time added: 48
Total interactions at time added: 239
Camera: Logitech Webcam
Post Production: Windows Movie Maker – medium use
Location: Home
Other people featured: None
Genre: Lesson
Music used: Daleko daleko (Far away) by Nosov, sung by Red Army Choir
Languages used: English, Russian
Animals/plants featured: None
Other remarks:

The last in the first series of the Huliganov Russian Course, here I put the alphabet, previously learned by grouping the letters from provenance, all back together again in dictionary order, along with a demonstration of handwriting using colours to show the order of attack for each letter when writing cursively.

It all wraps up with the usual crap joke and this time a rather poorly performed version of won of my favorite songs of all time, Daleko Daleko, by Nosov, in the version of Belayev, of the Red Army Choir.

RL 101-9 Soft sign, hard sign


Playout date: 10 December 2006
Duration: 20:47
Views at the time added to HTV: 27,355
Likes at the time added to HTV: 304
Dislikes at time added to HTV: 5
Popularity % ” ” ” =L/(L+D): 98.4%
Comments at time added: 102
Total interactions at time added: 411
Camera: Logitech Webcam
Post Production: Windows Movie Maker – heavy use
Location: Home
Other people featured: Irina and Elena and Sophie’s voice
Genre: Lesson
Music used: Cheburashka song (with Sophie James)
Languages used: Russian, English
Animals/plants featured: None
Other remarks:

The lesson on the role of hard and soft signs in the Russian language, part of Huliganov’s Russian couse. For the full course in order, see the naigation in the right hand ppane for the section on the course, or the course page in the navigation at the top.

RL101-8 Missing Vowels Pt 2 of 2.


Playout date: 21 November 2006
Duration: 10:07
Camera: Logitech Webcam
Post Production: Windows Movie Maker – medium use
Location: Office
Other people featured: None
Genre: Lesson
Music used: Cover of “They don’t know” by the lovely Kirstey MacColl via the lovely Tracey Ullmann.
Languages used: Russian
Animals/plants featured: Fish at rear
Other remarks:

The cover of “They don’t know” has been adopted to fit the needs of the learner of the Russian Language.

Sealy Phocas (South Africa series 4/10)


Playout date: 14 November 2006
Camera: Fuji Finepix
Post Production: Windows Movie Maker – slight use
Location: Hout Bay, Cape Town
Other people featured: David Uncleborough, Afrikaaner boat captain, Viktor Dmitrievitch Huliganov, Pierre Delauney
Genre: Environmental
Music used:  Heaven for Everyone, Queen
Languages used: English, but with Russian and French words for seal.
Animals featured: Arctocephalus pussilus, Cape fur seal

I rarely do a lot of different voices on one video, but this is one occasion. I do what I hope is a passable
impersonation of David Attenborough (I called this character David Uncleborough and he comes up a couple of times in my films), and also I do a South African, some Huliganov and some Pierre Delauney.
The Hout Bay cape fur seal colony is a beautiful thing to see. This is the part of the world where the great
white shark preys on these creatures, even jumping out of the water to attack them. We didn’t see any of them today, though.
The mountains around are the twelve apostles, very majestic neighbours of the Table Mountain.

RL101-7 The Sibilants


Playout date: 12 November 2006
Camera: Logitech Webcam
Post Production: Windows Movie Maker – medium use
Location: Capetown Arabella Sheraton, South Africa
Other people featured: None
Genre: Lesson
Music used: “Vdol’ po ulitse metelitsa metyot” with my wife
Languages used: Russian, English
Animals featured: None

In this seventh lesson in the 10 lesson course on the Russian alphabet known as RL-101 series, we find ourselves in the Arabella Sheraton in Cape Town South Africa, with table Mountain looming behind my head. This is the perfect setting to place a new set of consonants on the table, namely the sibilants.
The problem with the sibilants as far as Cyril and Methodius and their acolytes were concerned is that that is a group of consonants which you simply would not find in either Latin or Greek. To this day these sounds present difficulties to people transcribing Russian sounds into Western European languages. So whereas the sounds that we have met until now have come from Greek into the Cyrillic alphabet, the missionaries to the Slavs had to look for another source in order to render these sounds in Slavonic.

Hebrew was the next choice, being another biblical language. The letter shin and the letter tzaddi are both sibilants in Hebrew, so they were brought in and also amended, so that from shin we derive three sibilant letters in Russian, and from tzaddi we derive two.

The words introduced in this lesson are as follows:

that .., что
borshch (beetroot soup) борщ
in (acc/prep) в
Warsaw Варшава
you (formal/plural, acc/gen) вас
Washington Вашингтон
goodbye до свидания
stomach желудок
wife жена
woman женщина
fat жир
arse жопа
hello здравствуйте
how’s it going? как дела?
how? как?
when? когда?
end конец
of course конечно
face лицо
on (acc/prep) на
because потому, что
why? почему?
Friday пятница
Tashkent Ташкент
you (inf sing, acc/gen) тебя
comrade товарищ
what? что?
spy шпион
shi (cabbage soup) щи
egg яйцо

Title: RL101-6 The next 5 – 2/3 of the way


Playout date: 27 October 2006
Camera: Logitech Webcam
Post Production: Windows Movie Maker – heavy use
Location: Home
Other people featured: None
Genre: Lesson
Music used: I can’t help falling in love, Elvis Presley, karaoke.
Languages used: English and Russian
Animals featured: None

We look at another five letters, which is enough to take us two thirds of the way through the Russian alphabet.  That won’t mean being able to read two thirds of the words, of course, as most words are five or more letters long, and it only takes one of the these letters to be in the third not yet learned for the whole word not be readable.  However from this point on, the volume of words that we can indeed understand in full begins to increase out of proportion to the remainder of the journey.
Today’s letters are still letters deriving from Greek and not looking the same as in Latin, however these letters are also not written the same as they were in the original Greek.  That’s basically the idea of the course – back at the beginning we took a look at the six letters which are the same in Cyrillics as in the Latin alphabet we are probably familiar with ( hint – you’re reading it now) after which we looked at letters whose form in Cyrillics look like Latin letters but which sound different, and in each case they were also in Greek, and the Greek sound is basically the same as the Russian one.  We then went on to look at letters which are pretty much the same in the Cyrillic alphabet as they are in Greek, but which don’t resemble Latin letters and are therefore less likely to cause confusion.  The natural progression here is to look at the letters which really derive from Greek, but which also look slightly different to the way they looked in Greek. This will be followed by letters which derived from Hebrew instead, and then the mop up of the few letters left over at the end.  That’s basically the approach we’ve taken in this course to the Russian alphabet.

Huliganov rants at Borat


Playout date: 26 October 2006
Camera: Logitech Webcam
Post Production: Windows Movie Maker – medium use
Location: Office Jazdow 8a
Other people featured: None
Genre: Hulirant
Music used: Yesterday once more” by the Carpenters – karaoke track
Languages used: English
Animals featured: Fish behind, mainly Ameca splendens

How dare this Sacha Baron Cohen person pretend to be a Kazakhstanian when he is really an English person all along? It is shocking.  Such was the basic idea of this little film, and of course my regular viewers immediately got the irony.  But spare a thought for the casual commentator, who took it all on face value and some of the resulting comments are hilarious! Click on the video box to see them back in YouTube land…

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