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RL101-10 Russian Alphabet


Playout date: 24 December 2006
Duration: 20:38
Views at the time added to HTV: 26,526
Likes at the time added to HTV: 182
Dislikes at time added to HTV: 9
Popularity % ” ” ” =L/(L+D): 95.3%
Comments at time added: 48
Total interactions at time added: 239
Camera: Logitech Webcam
Post Production: Windows Movie Maker – medium use
Location: Home
Other people featured: None
Genre: Lesson
Music used: Daleko daleko (Far away) by Nosov, sung by Red Army Choir
Languages used: English, Russian
Animals/plants featured: None
Other remarks:

The last in the first series of the Huliganov Russian Course, here I put the alphabet, previously learned by grouping the letters from provenance, all back together again in dictionary order, along with a demonstration of handwriting using colours to show the order of attack for each letter when writing cursively.

It all wraps up with the usual crap joke and this time a rather poorly performed version of won of my favorite songs of all time, Daleko Daleko, by Nosov, in the version of Belayev, of the Red Army Choir.

RL 101-9 Soft sign, hard sign


Playout date: 10 December 2006
Duration: 20:47
Views at the time added to HTV: 27,355
Likes at the time added to HTV: 304
Dislikes at time added to HTV: 5
Popularity % ” ” ” =L/(L+D): 98.4%
Comments at time added: 102
Total interactions at time added: 411
Camera: Logitech Webcam
Post Production: Windows Movie Maker – heavy use
Location: Home
Other people featured: Irina and Elena and Sophie’s voice
Genre: Lesson
Music used: Cheburashka song (with Sophie James)
Languages used: Russian, English
Animals/plants featured: None
Other remarks:

The lesson on the role of hard and soft signs in the Russian language, part of Huliganov’s Russian couse. For the full course in order, see the naigation in the right hand ppane for the section on the course, or the course page in the navigation at the top.

RL101-8 Missing Vowels Pt 2 of 2.


Playout date: 21 November 2006
Duration: 10:07
Camera: Logitech Webcam
Post Production: Windows Movie Maker – medium use
Location: Office
Other people featured: None
Genre: Lesson
Music used: Cover of “They don’t know” by the lovely Kirstey MacColl via the lovely Tracey Ullmann.
Languages used: Russian
Animals/plants featured: Fish at rear
Other remarks:

The cover of “They don’t know” has been adopted to fit the needs of the learner of the Russian Language.

RL101-8 Missing Vowels Pt 1


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Playout date: 21 November 2006
Duration 12:27
Camera: Logitech Webcam
Post Production: Windows Movie Maker – slight use
Location: Office
Other people featured: None
Genre: Lesson
Music used: None
Languages used: Russian
Animals/plants featured: Fishtank at rear.

Explains how there is a hard set and a soft set of vowels in Russian. In other Slavic languages the Latin alphabet cannot always cope with this and the soft annotation moves to the consonants or use additional letter I’s.

Contains a comparison to what is the equivalent of the idea of soft and hard in West European languages, and how vowel systems work in a few other kind of languages to give some perspctive to the Slavic and especially the Russian system.

Question about Slavonic verb aspect.


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I received the following question from a person who was not specific as to whether they knew me from YT or some other source:

Hi David,

I have a question. Seeing you are a native speaker of English and a Slavic languages expert, I reckon you can answer this better than most!

What, in a nutshell, is verbal aspect all about? I know the grammar book stuff about “completed actions”, etc. It doesn’t cut it for me! What I need are some solid English equivalents. For example, when a Russian says (using future perfective aspect) “I will visit the museum tomorrow”, would we say: “I will have visited the museum (by) tomorrow”? Or is it more a sense of: “I will DO A VISIT to the museum tomorrow”? (Or is it something else entirely?)

And as regards the past perfective, what’s the deal if you want to say: “Tsar So-and-so built this palace in 1820”? Should that be perfective or imperfective? Or is there a choice? If so, what’s the difference?

I really want to learn some Russian but this stuff is doing my head in! (Cases are one thing – at least there is a clear logic there!) Any simple low-down help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks, J..

Verbal aspect is about whether the FOCUS of an utterance is concerned with whether the action of the verb is now over and done with or not, or, in the case where the verb describes a state like lying or standing, whether this state has changed or not.

If the answer is yes, then the perfective aspect is used, and in all other cases the imperfective aspect is used.  Read the rest of this entry

A conversation with a Russian learner about aspects of verbs.


English: Native language in Ukraine. Legend: U...

English: Native language in Ukraine. Legend: Ukrainian language dominates as the native language Russian language dominates as the native language. Bi-lingual, with a slight Ukrainian language lead (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

One of the followers of the video content on YouTube, Dennis, wrote asking about the question of aspects. I answered as I could and also as you will see got his permission to share the conversation so that more language learners would be able to take advantage of the topic.

  • Conversation started Thursday

  • 11:18

     
     

    Dennis Meurders

     

    Dear David,

    Thank you so much of the add. I’m honored! 
    I’m a very big fan of your youtube videos concerning the Russian language. I use them in addition of my Russian language course and I ust say that they give me a headstart of the rest. So they really help!
    I was wondering however if you could tell me which video talks about the time aspect ( поличать vs поличить) if you know what I mean with that. We talked about it yesterday in class and most people (including myself) find it very difficult.

    I hope you can help me out with this one.

    Thank you so much in advance!

    Dennis Meurders Read the rest of this entry

RL101-7 The Sibilants


Playout date: 12 November 2006
Camera: Logitech Webcam
Post Production: Windows Movie Maker – medium use
Location: Capetown Arabella Sheraton, South Africa
Other people featured: None
Genre: Lesson
Music used: “Vdol’ po ulitse metelitsa metyot” with my wife
Languages used: Russian, English
Animals featured: None

In this seventh lesson in the 10 lesson course on the Russian alphabet known as RL-101 series, we find ourselves in the Arabella Sheraton in Cape Town South Africa, with table Mountain looming behind my head. This is the perfect setting to place a new set of consonants on the table, namely the sibilants.
The problem with the sibilants as far as Cyril and Methodius and their acolytes were concerned is that that is a group of consonants which you simply would not find in either Latin or Greek. To this day these sounds present difficulties to people transcribing Russian sounds into Western European languages. So whereas the sounds that we have met until now have come from Greek into the Cyrillic alphabet, the missionaries to the Slavs had to look for another source in order to render these sounds in Slavonic.

Hebrew was the next choice, being another biblical language. The letter shin and the letter tzaddi are both sibilants in Hebrew, so they were brought in and also amended, so that from shin we derive three sibilant letters in Russian, and from tzaddi we derive two.

The words introduced in this lesson are as follows:

that .., что
borshch (beetroot soup) борщ
in (acc/prep) в
Warsaw Варшава
you (formal/plural, acc/gen) вас
Washington Вашингтон
goodbye до свидания
stomach желудок
wife жена
woman женщина
fat жир
arse жопа
hello здравствуйте
how’s it going? как дела?
how? как?
when? когда?
end конец
of course конечно
face лицо
on (acc/prep) на
because потому, что
why? почему?
Friday пятница
Tashkent Ташкент
you (inf sing, acc/gen) тебя
comrade товарищ
what? что?
spy шпион
shi (cabbage soup) щи
egg яйцо

Just a few thoughts to round off the quarter


The title page to the 1611 first edition of th...

Happy 400th birthday to thee

Well, ladies and gentlemen, we are at the end of another quarter, known in the mouth of the people as Q3 – 2011.  You can call me a typical accountant if you like, but I always tend to be aware of these quarter ends and I tend to have certain aims and goals for what I like to achieve both professionally and in my hobbies each quarter and so days like today are an opportunity to take stock of where I am.

Doing so generated just a couple of thoughts which I thought I’d like to share with you.

I had a nice long time in the UK, and was supposed to be taking time off, but in the event work kept me fairly involved even though at a distance, and I made little progress on the writing projects I had in mind, especially the Goldlist book and the workbook for the Huliganov Russian course. Hence these are not really ready to show yet, apologies to those of my viewers and readers whom I may have led to hope that they would be. Work has to come first, I have to be able to look after my family.

It’s also three quarters through the 400th anniversary year of the KJV and I also didn’t get far with the readings of the KJV I wanted to do – this is all in the last quarter now if I’m going to do it at all in this year.

In Japanese I made a slight breakthrough while discovering a way to adapt goldlist principles to working through the Heising book and getting the best of both worlds – more on that when I get further on with it. In any event I registered for the Japanese Language Proficiency Test, level 5, which is on Decmber 4th in Warsaw, which is a target to work towards,

World events seem to be leaving something to be desired, with hurricanes in the UK, people defrauding UBS out of money that makes Nick Leeson look like a small timer, and the continuing threat of the EURO going down the tubes at the hands of defaults by Greece and other weaker countries, as well as a few nights of crazy behaviour in the UK by vandals and malcontents out for some fun at the expense of working people have made the last quarter a very strange time. We are edging nearer and nearer to a precipice. Winter will draw in soon, the nights will be longer, the days colder, and we are going to be in for a long and hard winter.

Last winter I wrote an article explaining to UK people and others from places where the winters are normally mild how to go about surviving a Siberian style winter. I recommend you read this once again and think about it.

https://huliganov.tv/2010/12/16/huliganovs-winter-hinters/ is the place to go for it.

Many thanks again to my loyal viewers and readers, which here on this blog currently number 96. Thanks especially to those of you who join in on discussions, I hope for more of that. If I am sometimes slow in getting to moderate them, sorry. I have to keep the mod thing on because otherwise a lot of spam will get on, which thanks to the new technology is not the case at the moment, and sometimes I don’t have the ability to go online every evening.

Every comment is valued, even if I don’t have anything to say back to some.

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