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Huliganov’s Barcelona Experience #4 – Una Comida Memorablisima


Original YT playout date: 6 April 2008
Duration: 10:08

A Most Memorable Meal was something I recently was treated to by business partners in Barcelona. You can see it, unfortunately I can’t pass on the taste or the smell of it but suffice it to say it was perfect.

For all I know there may be a whole lot more such restaurants in Barcelona, but I can wholly recommend this one, Restaurante La Dama on Avinguyda Diagonal.
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NTTBS 23rd March Test Post (Purple language warning)


Original (YT) playout date: 9 April 2008, (on Radio 23 March 2008)
Duration: 3:00:09

“Not The Tommy Boyd Show from Play Two UK.
***PURPLE LANGUAGE WARNING***
If you are easily offended, or even offendable at all, then better not to watch this series of videos. It is for aficionados of the more unbridled style of discourse, and not for young or impressionable ears.

Those of you who know me from the eclectic group of fans of the talk radio legend Tommy Boyd may be aware from the shrine posts that in response to Stu’s request I agreed to take on the task of youtubecasting the show feeds, which used to be done, and done extremely well, on the channel wwwplayradioukdotcom here on YouTube. Since December, that channel’s owner has not (either wanted to or been able to, I don’t know, but either way he hasn’t) continued. That was a channel entirely dedicated to the show, whereas as agreed in the Tommy Boyd forum my screenings will be on my channel, which has very mixed forms of films on it already and a fairly varied subscriber base. This means I can probably get more exposure for this show than the dedicated channel could, but on the other hand I want to squeeze each show onto a single film, so as not to flood this channel with items which may not be exactly what the bulk of subscribers signed up for.

Hence I purchased PowerDirector 6.0, and this is my very first attempt with it. All I wanted to do is test whether I could actually do it, that is get a three hour feed plus audio off two studio cameras onto a single clip on this channel. If you’re reading this, it worked.

I am aware that there are faults in this test post. First, I’ve managed to squeeze the audio too far. It’s what you might call “”AM”” rather than “”FM”” quality. Actually, make that “”SW””. I also did the picture in picture too small, and the facial expressions of Arron and Jo can’t be seen properly. I also did not do any editing or effects on this, as all it is is a test run, but I want to put it up anyway to let the fans of the show know that it’s on its way, and to get some feedback.

To participate in this show live go to http://stuandmatt.servebeer.com from 7 to 11 pm UK time on Sunday nights.”

45:47 is Viktor Huliganov’s appearance. 1:12:23 is Riley Martins famous clip.

Quote of the clip: “Life’s gonna suck when you grow up”

***Statistics and Credits***
Views at the time added to HTV: 312
Likes at the time added to HTV: 3
Dislikes at time added to HTV: 0
Popularity % ” ” ” =L/(L+D): 100.0%
Comments at time added: 3
Total interactions at time added: 6
Total interactions to views 1.9%
Location: Online, in studio.
Other people featured: Matt Hollick, Stuart Heron, Jo McAfferty,
Genre: Radio show
Music used: Several pieces of music used, hence blocked in some places.
Languages used: English
Animals/plants featured: None

Uncle Davey’s World Halma Challenge


Original playout date: 7 April 2008
Duration: 0:49

This is a game of 10 by 10 halma with a lady called Uschi – a 74 year old lady, by the way, and she beats me by three stones. If a 74 year old can wipe the floor with me, so can you. Find Uncle Davey on http://www.itsyourturn.com which has both paid and unpaid levels of membership, and see how well you beat me at 10*10halma!
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You Tube – The End Of Civilization As We Know It (yeah right)


Original playout date: 7 April 2008
Duration: 36:33

“This is the belated rant for December, although, despite a tiny amount of Christmas related talk at the beginning, most of this rant refers to an article in the online Telegraph dated 7 April 2008, which is when I made the rant.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2008/04/07/nweb107.xml
Some sense-starved junkalist, hiding behind the weasel phrase “”experts have warned””, presumes today to describe our use of the available bandwidth as less valid than his own use, for newspaper articles. I contend that anyone can write – at least at the stylistic level of his article, give or take a few spelling mistakes – whereas not everyone can produce entertaining and informative online video content. Therefore I go on to challenge the author of that article to produce his own video response to my rant, if he thinks that YouTube is such a bad idea, let him tell it to us face-to-face, over the camera.

On the way I give advice to town planners about traffic management in cities, and give a few pointers, which, if only listened to by the right ears, could greatly improve the quality of life for millions living in cities whose commuting plight today is largely caused by the control-freak complexes of minor government employees, and their inability to let free-market philosophy impact on road design.”
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Secret Love


Original playout date: 7 April 2008
Duration: 3:26

I once had one, but not any more. A nice romantic film here with pretty pictures of my wife blending in and out.
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Huliganov’s Turkish Experience #19 – “Hotel Sapphire and Hamdi Restaurant, Eminonu”


Original playout date: 7 April 2008
Duration: 7:57

A look at two Turkish delights in Istanbul, the Hotel Sapphire where we stayed, and the Hamdi Restaurant in Eminonou, where I also ate many years later with a different group.
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Playradio weightloss challenge Weight Update


Original playout date: 6 April 2008
Duration: 0:56

This video is significant in a couple of ways. Firstly, it is the first video on this channel connected to the time I was part of a community of listeners to a talk radio channel called Playradio UK. It involved such established UK talk radio talent s Tommy Boyd, Mike Mendoza and James Whale, but also burgeoned new talent from the co-presenters, as well as developing creativity on the part of listeners who contributed to the shows, one of whom was me.
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Victor Berrjod’s excellent rebuttal of Bartosz Czekała’s hatchet piece against the GoldList Method


Thank you for your interest in the Goldlist Method! I see that your article contains a lot of misconceptions about it, so that even though your understanding of memory is accurate, you reach the wrong conclusion in the end. I’ll try to clear things up for you, since I have been using the GLM for many years and to great effect.

“But how do you know it’s effective? Is it actually based on any real science?”

This is a rhetorical question, but I will answer it anyway. You know it’s effective when it does what it is designed to do. And the GLM does do what it is designed to. And it is based on real science, namely on the forgetting curve. The two weeks are the core of the method; everything else is more or less optional.

“First of all, here is a great video which sums up what this method is all about.”

Christopher Huff’s video is indeed great, but it is intended as a tl;dr version of the full explanation, so it is good that you have included a link to a fuller explanation. However, it would have been even better if you had also included the link to David’s newly refined explanation so that readers could get it straight from the horse’s mouth. The new explanation seeks to clear up common misunderstandings that have become apparent and that he was not (and couldn’t have been) aware of when he first posted it.

“The author of the method maintains that:
1. The method allows you to retain up to thirty percent of the words in your long-term memory.”

This is only partly true. It isn’t the method itself that gives you a 30% retention rate. Rather, the method is based on the observation that, on average, people remember around 30% of the words after two weeks. This is illustrated by Ebbinghaus’s forgetting curve later in the article, so I will get back to this.

“2. It is also claimed that the process circumvents your short-term memory – you are expected to make no conscious effort to remember words. Thanks to this the information will be retained in your long-term memory.”

A better way to put it is that it is claimed that conscious memorization is discouraged because it is less effective for long-term retention (but indeed better for short-term retention). David does speak in terms of switching on and off memory functions, but he is not a memory scholar, so his hypotheses are not written in the standard academic terminology.
victorgun

“1. It doesn’t circumvent short-term memory
One of the big claims of this method is that it is able to circumvent your short-term memory. Somehow, thanks to it, you are able to place all the information straight in your long-term memory.”

Well, around 30% of it, and the method is based on the retention rczekalsate, not the other way around.

“In other words, initiation of consolidation is under conscious control and requires the use of central attention. The mere fact of looking at a piece of paper and reading/writing words activates it.”

That’s right, but remember that what David calls ‘short-term memory’ is not the same as ‘working memory’. In GLM terms, the long-term memory is everything you still remember after two weeks, and anything you didn’t remember for two weeks is considered to have been stored in the short-term memory. In standard academic terminology, both of these would be considered ‘long-term memory’.

“Next, the items you learn undergo working memory consolidation.
Working memory consolidation refers to the: transformation of transient sensory input into a stable memory representation that can be manipulated and recalled after a delay.
Contrary to what the creator of this method believes, after this process is complete, be it 2 weeks or more, the short-term memories are not gone. They are simply not easily accessible.”

In practical terms, it doesn’t really make much of a difference whether a memory is gone or you are unable to access it. The result is the same: you have forgotten it.

“You probably have experienced this phenomenon yourself many times. You learned something in the past. Then, after some years, you took it up again and were able to regain your ability relatively quickly. It was possible because your memories were still there. They just became “neuronally disconnected” and thus inaccessible.”

Indeed. This is what is called ‘activation’ in GLM terms.

“What’s more, the Ebbinghaus curve’s numbers are based on the assumption that the learned material :
– means nothing to you
– has no relevance to your life
– has no emotional load and meaning for you
On the curve, you can see that if you memorize information now and try to recall after 14 days, you will be able to retrieve about 21-23% of the previously memorized knowledge. Mind you that this is the knowledge which is incoherent, bears no emotional load and means nothing to you.”

Exactly. So when the words (or whatever else you want to remember) aren’t random, but part of a language you want to learn, we would expect this number to be somewhat higher. And it does indeed seem to be around 30% on average.

“What happens when you start manually writing down words which interest you or when you are able to establish some connection between them and your life? Well, this number can definitely go up.

Keep in mind that your recall rate will also be affected by:
– frequency of occurrence
– prior vocabulary knowledge
– cognateness.

So is there anything magical about the method and the number “30”?
Nope. It follows very precisely the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve which takes into account your short-term memory. Sometimes this number will be higher, sometimes it will be lower depending on your choice of words.”

That’s right. And this is what the GLM is based on.

“The Gold List Method is just a spaced repetition method with bigger intervals.”

That’s right, and for good reason. Normal spaced repetition systems try to catch words and bring them back as soon as you forget them, but by doing so, you end up reviewing a lot of words that you already know. In fact, based on the forgetting curve you probably know about 30% of the material essentially for life after having looked at it only once, and yet you will spend valuable study time reviewing it.

In the GLM system, you instead wait until you’ve forgotten all or almost all of what you won’t remember for life, and only then do your review. After two weeks, the forgetting curve is almost completely flat, so that is a good cut-off point.

“Even though the Gold List Method has initially the low activation energy, it starts growing considerably with each and every distillation.”

I’m sorry, what? Each distillation lessens it, if anything, because there are fewer lines for each distillation.

“Having to carry with you a couple of A4 notebooks seems also very impractical to me.”

The vast majority of distillations require only one book, and it does not have to be A4. Only the initial headlist and each transfer into a new book require more than one book.

“However, the biggest problem I have with this method in this department is that it suggests I only learn words I am interested in.”

No, it doesn’t mean that in the way you take it to mean. With any method you have to decide which words you are going to learn, e.g. all the words in your textbook, all the words of a certain frequency, etc. These words are the ones you want to learn, or in other words, the ones you are interested in learning.

“Good learning methods should work for any kind of vocabulary.s
And they should work particularly well for the vocabulary you’re interested in.”

Yeah, like the GLM. 🙂

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RL 102 – 15 Russian Basic Grammar Lesson #15


Original playout date: 6 April 2008
Duration: 18:54

“Verbs of type 1b with infinitives in
-yt’. Also more about the imperatives and the past tense, and the way aspects work. Long lesson”
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Uncle Davey’s Herts Content, #13 “More Geese than Swans”, aka “fowling the water”.


Original playout date: 5 April 2008
Duration: 8:32

We’re having fun feeding the birds by the Gade in the Water Gardens in Hemel Hempstead, Sophie and me.
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Irina showing off my bookshelves


Original playout date: 5 April 2008
Duration: 3:48

In answer to two sets of requests – from some viewers wishing to examine these shelves a bit closer, and from others wanting more of Irina… in the meantime she got married and had a kid, so you’re outta luck.
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Huliganov’s Turkish Experience #18 – “Arrival in Istanbul again”


Original playout date: 4 April 2008
Duration: 9:20

This starts the third of my three trips in 2008 to Turkey, which makes up this series, so in a sense I am in the home straight. On this occasion I was accompanied by my boss and good friend Adam, who is keeping quiet during the filming.
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