Category Archives: Poetry and Songs

Goethic Horror


Playout date: 10 March 2007
Duration: 10:44
Views at the time added to HTV: 294
Likes at the time added to HTV: 8
Dislikes at time added to HTV: 1
Popularity % ” ” ” =L/(L+D): 88.9%
Comments at time added: 0
Total interactions at time added: 9
Total interactions to views 3.1%
Camera: Logitech Webcam
Post Production: None
Location: Jazdów 8A, Warsaw
Other people featured: Christopher Chadwick
Genre: Friends
Music used: None
Languages used: English, German
Animals/plants featured: None
Other remarks:

Chris Chadwick work with me for a while, and we had fun sometimes with German poetry because he was a proper intellectual. Very clever and not always easy to get along with. He’s not in Poland now and we are all the poorer for it.

Goethe’s poems are the order of the day here, with Erlkoenig recited by Christopher and Wanderers Nachthemd recited by me, all the time contending with the vagaries of modern, as it was then, technology, which we identify as the biggest problem poetry has, in that you cannot get to the end of a poem without the internet crashing (this was 2007) or a phone going off.

Quote of the clip: “Praising Google is always a good idea on YouTube, because they, like, own it”.

Lord, for Thy tender mercy’s sake (Farrant)


Playout date: 9 February 2007
Duration: 2:56
Views at the time added to HTV: 29,900
Likes at the time added to HTV: 42
Dislikes at time added to HTV: 0
Popularity % ” ” ” =L/(L+D): 100.0%
Comments at time added: 13
Total interactions at time added: 55
Total interactions to views 0.2%
Camera: Panasonic DMZ -FZ31
Post Production: Windows Movie Maker – heavy use
Location: Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Warsaw
Other people featured: FNOK
Genre: Concert
Music used: Henry Purcell, “Thou knowest, Lord, the secrets of our heartss”
Languages used: English
Animals/plants featured: None
Other remarks:

Another piece from the concert in aid of the Mine disaster in Halemab, hosted by Holy Sepulchre Church in Warsaw, the church most people know as where the heart of Chopin is entombed in one pillar.

This anthem was composed by Richard Farrant based on a text from the sixteenth century prayerbook “Lidley’s Prayers”:

“Lord, for thy tender mercy’s sake,
lay not our sins to our charge,
but forgive that is past
and give us grace to amend our sinful lives;
to decline from sin and incline to virtue,
that we may walk in a perfect heart
before thee now and evermore.   ”

Quote of the clip: “to decline from sin and incline to virtue”

Thou knowest, Lord, the secrets of our hearts (Purcell)


Playout date: 9 February 2007
Duration: 2:33
Views at the time added to HTV: 36,674
Likes at the time added to HTV: 34
Dislikes at time added to HTV: 6
Popularity % ” ” ” =L/(L+D): 85.0%
Comments at time added: 15
Total interactions at time added: 55
Camera: Logitech Webcam
Post Production: None
Location: Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Warsaw
Other people featured: None
Genre: Concert
Music used: Henry Purcell, “Thou knowest, Lord, the secrets of our heartss”
Languages used: English
Animals/plants featured: None
Other remarks:

Another piece from the concert in aid of the Mine disaster in Halemab, hosted by Holy Sepulchre Church in Warsaw, the church most people know as where the heart of Chopin is entombed in one pillar.

This anthem was composed by Henry Purcell for the funeral of Queen Mary II in 1695.

I write these words on the birthday of Richard Berkeley who remains until today one of the most treasured friends we have made in Warsaw, and also the conduit of many other good friendships I have made, one of which with someone I also had the good fortune to meet today.

If ye love Me, keep My commandments


Playout date: 31 January 2007
Duration: 3:12
Views at the time added to HTV: 66,348
Likes at the time added to HTV: 76
Dislikes at time added to HTV: 11
Popularity % ” ” ” =L/(L+D): 87.4%
Comments at time added: 32
Total interactions at time added: 119
Camera: Panasonic DMZ -FZ30
Post Production: None
Location: Church of Holy Sepulchre, Warsaw
Other people featured: Nowa Orkiestra Kameralna
Genre: Concert
Music used: If ye love me, by Thomas Tallis
Languages used: English
Animals/plants featured: None
Other remarks:

This performance by Richard Berkeley’s Nowa Orkiestra Kameralna of Thomas Tallis’ wonderful setting of John 14:15-17 has been enjoyed by many people in this YT clip. Indeed, although the Church (where Chopin’s heart lies entombed in a pillar) was full of people on the night, one hundred times as many have heard this thanks to the wonders of YT and social media.

Richard Berkeley was then and remains now one of the treasures among the non_polish community of Warsaw. He has contributed immensely to the cultural and social life of this city and of my family’s experience of it. His view that music brings people together is only part of it. His great personality also has that effect. When I look through my contacts I am sometimes amazed to see the number of people I met through Richard.

Richard, if you should chance to be reading this, thank you.

Love Unknown


Playout date: 26 November 2006
Duration: 2:52
Views at the time added to HTV: 4,637
Likes at the time added to HTV: 16
Dislikes at time added to HTV: 2
Popularity % ” ” ” =L/(L+D): 88.9%
Comments at time added: 1
Total interactions at time added: 19
Camera: Panasonic DMZ -FZ30
Post Production: Windows Movie Maker – slight use
Location: Basilica of the Holy Cross, Warsaw
Other people featured: Richard Berkeley (conductor) and the Nowa Orkiestra Kameralna
Genre: Charity Concert (for Halemba mine disaster victims)
Music used: My Song is Love Unknown by Samuel Crossman
Languages used: English
Animals/plants featured: None
Other remarks:

 

On the video you will see some information about how this was a Charity concert for the mine Disaster at Halemba in 2006. Money was raised for the families of the victims.

What may I say?

Last year, I sang this at my mother’s funeral last year as it was her particular request from me that I should do so, this was her all time favorite hymn and also one of mine. While she was still with us, but ill, one of the last videos I watched with my mother was this one. She was as ever moved to tear by it.

Let me just give you the wonderful words of Crossman:

My song is love unknown,
My Saviour’s love to me;
Love to the loveless shown,
That they might lovely be.
O who am I,
That for my sake
My Lord should take
Frail flesh and die?

He came from His blest throne
Salvation to bestow;
But men made strange, and none
The longed-for Christ would know:
But O! my Friend,
My Friend indeed,
Who at my need
His life did spend.

Sometimes they strew His way,
And His sweet praises sing;
Resounding all the day
Hosannas to their King:
Then “Crucify!”
is all their breath,
And for His death
they thirst and cry.

Why, what hath my Lord done?
What makes this rage and spite?
He made the lame to run,
He gave the blind their sight,
Sweet injuries!
Yet they at these
Themselves displease,
and ’gainst Him rise.

They rise and needs will have
My dear Lord made away;
A murderer they save,
The Prince of life they slay,
Yet cheerful He
to suffering goes,
That He His foes
from thence might free.

In life no house, no home,
My Lord on earth might have;
In death no friendly tomb,
But what a stranger gave.
What may I say?
Heav’n was his home;
But mine the tomb
Wherein he lay.

Here might I stay and sing,
No story so divine;
Never was love, dear King!
Never was grief like Thine.
This is my Friend,
in Whose sweet praise
I all my days
could gladly spend.

May you be able to recognise such a Friend for yourself in the Friend of sinners, Lord, Creator and Kinsman Redeemer Jesus Christ.

Gold List Method for Scripture Memorisation


Man shall not live by bread alone…

Greetings gentle readers after a long lapse in posting.

I was recently contacted in e-mail by a Christian polyglot some of my readers will know personally from Gatherings, Brother Fiel Sahir, who wrote:

Hi David! I did some googling but maybe I messed up and I haven’t found where you’ve discussed this, but have you further developed the GLM for scripture memorization?  I know for a fact that you were goldlisting sentences when I met you, but what I recall was you used those sentences to help you remember a focus word rather than the sentence itself.  Just something interesting, because a friend of mine has encouraged me to begin memorizing scripture. A spiritual discipline that is definitely underated and under practiced in my opinion, first and foremost by myself.  Anyways, I look forward to your response, but a blogpost would be more beneficial to the world, so I await that as well!  Thanks David. I hope to see you around soon!

In response to this, I wrote the following:

Dear Br. Fiel,

Anything which is to be learned to the Long Term Memory can best be learned using GLM. My suggestion would be to select a passage which you would like to be able to repeat verbatim, at any time later in you life, and place it into the headlist with let us say no more than five words per line.

 

  1. The Lord is my shepherd
  2. I shall not want. He
  3. Maketh me to lie down in
  4. Green pastures, he leadeth me
  5. Beside the quiet waters. He
  6. Restoreth my soul…

Etc.

When you have left this two weeks as with any other GoldList project, if it is a passage you already substantially knew, but are trying to get word perfect I would try to write it on D1 position as accurately as possible, but in pencil, covering the original over on the left side. Here you can write maybe seven words at a time. Then note any mistakes you made, in the little words, bits missed out altogether, punctuation, if that’s something you want to get right too, verse numbers (which I didn’t include in the example, but if you ant to be able to remember them, then pay attention to that) and highlight those errors with a red pen or highlighter. Your 25 lines will now anyway be 17 lines just by dint of writing 7 words instead of 5 at D1.

Obviously that’s not a strategy that can continue indefinitely, so at D2 you will take a slightly different approach. You will probably not try to write out the whole from memory at D2, but instead write out the parts where you had had a problem before. The bits where you had no problem, just write the first letter of each word. Write tightly, allowing as many words per line as is comfortable.

Remember you are leaving at least two weeks again between D1 and D2, and the same when you turn D2 to D3, but here you can simply leave out and not even write the first letter of words if you know that you remember confidently the whole sentence. In order to remember the flow of idea in a longer passage, consider writing the first and last words in each clause, and maybe with abbreviations.

  1. The Lord..want, he maketh..gpast,he leadeth beside tqw. Restoreth.

That may well be where you are by D3 or D4, with 6 lines now looking like a single line.

And you can carry on that way. So, please let me know how you get on. And since you asked for a blogpost, I will base one on your query and my answer. Can I use your name and text?

To which Fiel responded that I could. And thanks to his query and willingness to let me share, we have here something which I hope will encourage many of you to try a project of GLM for long term memorization of a holy text.

Even if you are not Bible believing, you can probably try it on the Qur’aan or on some poetry you want to rote learn for life. I recommend Scripture though. It is what David said needed to be “hid in mine heart, that I might not sin against thee”, and if this tool can help towards the hiding of Divine words in the heart, I don’t know what higher thing can be said of the GoldList Method.

 

Poem on the whole history of human language


I recently expanded my earlier metrical version of the Genesis account of Babel to include some further points on the history of language from that point onwards and beyond the veil of Eternity. Hope you enjoy this and find it edifying.

1.
The earth had once one speech o’erall. One tongue men used, to tell
From th’East to Shinar’s plain they came and settled there, to dwell.
Among themselves did they conspire “Bricks let us make,” said they
“To building stones them throughly burn and slime for morter lay.”
“Go to,” said they, “a city great, a tow’r to reach the sky,
We shall construct unto ourselves, our name to magnify
Lest scattered far abroad we be the whole earth’s face around”
They built the walls from bricks they’d baked and slime from lime they’d found.

2.
The Lord looked down at Adam’s kin and saw their undertaking
He knew that left alone this would become mankind’s unmaking
Although still in his infancy, not yet a million souls
Mankind was learning things with which he’d score fatal own goals
Adamic language and long life allowed the human mind
To know and build technologies while immature and blind
The Lord said “See, this people is by language unified
Now can no thing their power restrain their will to realise”

3.
“Now let Us unto them descend, their language to confound
That each the other’s speech and tongue no more may understand.”
And so the LORD did scatter them all o’er the earth from thence.
Their city no more could they build. Its name is Babel hence:
That there the LORD in mighty pow’r the earth’s speech did confound,
And He from thence did scatter them the whole earth’s face around.
For here the Lord unto each soul his single language giving
Ensured that man’s wish was to be with but close kindred living

4.
And so each man his nearest took and from the crowd did flee
They lived alone until they spoke one tongue per family
The mother taught the babies hers, the father also learned it
The elder siblings got to add some features if they earned it
And families at length combined by dint of need to wed
So tribal languages emerged as Babel’s tongues went dead
And tribe fought tribe, and strong tribes grew, their tribal tongue promoting:
The structure ever simpler, the word-stock ever growing

5.
And as they filled the earth and crossed each hill and vale and river,
Some tribes grew great and in due course their languages did sever
Through ice and fire and flood and marsh men walked and faced all dangers
To use all space this world allowed and grow to outnumber angels
And language families emerged that had one time been one
But once again they could no more grasp one another’s tongue.
One tribe, the seed of Abraham, in whom all would be blest
Got history and prophesy to cherish for the rest.

6.
But man since Babel always sought to get back there again
To build the city, raise the tower and make himself a name.
To make the countries all one state and into Unions bind
And place a ruler over all, as blind will lead the blind
Each man who tasted power’s rush soon hatched the grand ambition
To subjugate all men to himself as slaves to his volition.
But rulership of this world here is but for its Creator.
It is reserved for God the Christ and He shall take it later.

7.
For only Christ makes all things good: he’ll teach us what was missing
And speak to us in tongues of men, while angels throng to listen.
And when the Resurrection comes and all things be made new,
That ancient tongue shall sound again, the one that Adam knew.
The lives of men became too short to learn that perfect tongue
But it will be a joy to learn for the forever-young.
And so when we are healed in heart, bodies and minds restored
Again we’ll learn that language giv’n to Adam by the Lord.

The Psalms of Davey #10 – “O blest and only Potentate”


This is the tenth of my cycle of ten Hymns, called “The Psalms of Davey”. They are being reproduced in a special category on this blog one after another. In only one case is the tune my own (that’s this one – number ten). In other cases, please follow the links to get to the midi for the tunes, courtesy of http://www.cyberhymnal.org To find the category of “Psalms of Davey” please review the categories section in the side bar.

10. “O BLEST AND ONLY POTENTATE”

(Words and music, Uncle Davey, Cambridge, 1986. Tune name “Alexandra”.) In fact this is the only one of the hymns where I prefer my own tune, Alexandra, which is an 8888 metre tune.

At the moment I don’t have a version of the tune Alexandra to upload.

My suggested chord progression, if the melody starts on E, is C, C, d, e, C / C, G, e, F, G7 / d, d, e, F, G7 / d, F, d, F, C, (G7).

The hymn was written as a one-off, at a different time, rather later than the others, after it seemed that I had stopped writing hymns. I did not even keep it over the years in the same book with the others. Nevertheless, it must be evident that it is much of a muchness with the other hymns written by me, possibly the best of them from a poetic viewpoint, with much theology. Probably if someone felt they could take only one hymn from my collection and add it to a hymn book for use in churches, I suppose I would most rather that this one were chosen, especially as it has its own tune, with number six as possibly second choice.

As befits a closing hymn, this one is based on a New Testament doxology, in this case a pauline doxology for Timothy, that tells us among many other verses that Christ is God. If you have been looking at all the hymns from the beginning of the collection to this, the end, thank you for your patience in bearing with me. I consider it a tremendous priviledge to have a readership, and am always delighted with any feedback, either by mail or on the comments section.  Another project I have in mind for the future is a page linking to my most favorite hymns of all time.

God bless, and please enjoy the articles and other parts of my site.

1.
O blest and only Potentate,
Thou King of Kings and Lord of Lords
I look unto Thy mercies great
And I am lost, am lost for words.

2.
Thou didst in kindness set Thy love
Upon this wicked soul of mine
E’en or Thou camest from above
E’en or the sun, the sun did shine.

3.
Thou hast in anguish lovéd me
When beat the sun upon Thy brow
When nailéd to the accurséd tree
For me at Calvary wast Thou.

4.
T’was then all bleeding on the rood
That Thou didst mine atonement make
Thou didst eclipse the wrath of God
In dying, dying for my sake.

5.
Although Thou righteous art alway
And glorious in Thine holiness
Yet didst Thou take my plague away
And clothe me, clothe me in Thy dress.

6.
Christ, Thou hast scanned mine inmost thought
Yea, known mine every grief and care
And  Thou hast intercession wrought
And holy, spotless made my prayer.

7.
Shall I not say; Thou art my King?
My Lord and God I shall adore
Thy name proclaim, thy glories sing
Henceforth, till death, and evermore.

 

“I give thee charge in the sight of God, who quickeneth all things, and before Christ Jesus, who before Pontius Pilate witnessed a good confession; That thou keep this commandment without spot, unrebukable, until the appearing of our Lord Jesus Christ: Which in his times he shall shew, who is the blessed and only Potentate, the King of kings, and Lord of lords; Who only hath immortality, dwelling in the light which no man can approach unto; whom no man hath seen, nor can see: to whom be honour and power everlasting. Amen.” (1 Timothy 6 vv 13-16)

First published 27th June 2004, on usenetposts.com

 

The Psalms of Davey #9 – “The Earth had once one Speech o’erall”


This is the ninth of my cycle of ten Hymns, called “The Psalms of Davey”. They are being reproduced in a special category on this blog one after another. In only one case is the tune my own (that’ll be number ten). In other cases, please follow the links to get to the midi for the tunes, courtesy of http://www.cyberhymnal.org To find the category of “Psalms of Davey” please review the categories section in the right hand side bar.

9. “THE EARTH HAD ONCE ONE SPEECH O’ERALL”

(Words Uncle Davey, Hemel Hempstead, 31st December 1984. Music Charles Collignon (1725-1785) Tune name “University”.) The tune is often sung to Scottish Psalms arranged in common metre. The Scottish Church made many arrangements of scripture in common metre, which is the 8.6.8.6 metre we see here, because they believed in keeping all worship as close to the bible as possible, and what better than to actually sing the Bible, and hence there is a whole book of metrical Psalms for use by Presbyterians and it has various other portions of the Word of God other than the Psalms also in metre.

This was my attempt at putting into common metre a particular favorite passage of mine, namely the explanation in Genesis 11 verses 1-9 of where languages appeared. (There is more discussion of this matter in my article “On the Origin of Speeches” on this site, if you have any doubt in your mind about the absolute literal reliability of the scriptures with regard to the Babel event). Note also the ‘us’ of ‘Let Us go down’. The triune God was involved in the confounding of the Adamic Language, and Christ himself, the second Adam and the Living Word, was involved in providing the very words of all the post Adamic living languages!

Collignon is a little known figure, this tune being the only one of his which is generally used. It is named one assumes for Cambridge University, where he lived and taught, and where I also lived and learned, but two centuries later, worshipping the same Jesus, who had not changed a bit over that time.

First published 27th June 2004, Go back to list of hymns, Go back to home page or Go to Bulletin Board
(NB. The picture to the right was taken in 1985, this is how I looked when I wrote this hymn.)

1.
The earth had once one speech o’erall
One tongue men used, to tell
From th’east to Shinar’s plain they came
And settled there to dwell

2.
Among themselves did they conspire
“Bricks let us make,” said they
“To building stones them throughly burn
And slime for morter lay.”

3.
“Go to,” said they, “a city great,
A tow’r to reach the sky,
We shall construct unto ourselves
Our name to glorify

4.
Lest scattered far abroad we be
The whole earth’s face upon”
The LORD then from on high beheld
Their tow’r and city strong.

5.
The LORD said “See, this people is
By language unified
Now can no thing their power restrain
Their will to realise”

6.
“Now let Us unto them descend
Their language to confound
That each the other’s speech and tongue
No more may understand.”

7.
And so the LORD did scatter them
All o’er the earth from thence.
Their city no more could they build.
It’s name is Babel hence:

8.
That there the LORD in mighty pow’r
The earth’s speech did confound,
And He from thence did scatter them
The whole earth’s face around.

Ode to a Lazy Subordinate


(I don’t really mean this, it’s just a humorous poem, which I wrote ten years ago, and just came across it going through old papers…)

If you were a daphnia,
A hydra or a snail,
You’d be more scared of a clown loach
Than of a killer whale.

Small things bother the little ones
Great things bother the great
So don’t come at me with your issues
Trying to upwardly delegate.

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