Category Archives: Personal Favorites

Original Song for Valentines Day – in the Shade of the White Plum Tree


Original YT playout date: 11 February 2010
Duration: 3:59

I was helped along in the lyrics by Wufwufwufwuf and MikeCut777, so thanks to those guys, on comments to an earlier video. Here’s the working release of the song in time for Valentines Day. Those who can perform it better, are welcome to go ahead. The mp3 of this is available on this blog. It is the same song as the one in the footer of this blog and is probably my favorite of my own compositions to date.

I am inviting collaboration or covers, and in order to ease the process, I’d like to say that there are only 5 chords necessary to play this song.

The ones I used were C, e, a, F, G7. The e a e a transition gets repeated a few times in the refrain and the chorus part also. Obviously you can doll it up all you like, but basically those 5 are all I used.”
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Tom off Tots TV talks about Listening with PMS, and Alan does his Jade Goody reportage.


Original YT playout date: 7 January 2010
Duration: 2:363

It’s 23rd March 2009, Tommy and Fiona are in the studio, but it’s not long before the listeners take over the agenda – first off is Tom off Tots TV, asking why PRUK doesn’t do “”Listen with Mother””. But Fiona and Tommy are having none of this blatant sexism from the now extinct children’s TV puppet. But their tactics are not strictly ballroom! When Tom Ragdoll cites the research of Jean Piaget, Tommy tries to discredit Piaget’s findings and trick Tom off Tots TV into thinking the celebrated Swiss psychologist was a woman, and then to cap that he asks the blue-haired Tot to hold the line – at which point he dumps the call!

This is followed by a two-seconder from everyone’s favorite radio Spaniard, and then Alan Caddick takes up the cudgels to introduce the listening public to the phenomenon of Jade Goody. Which soon brings the subject back to maternal deprivation again, and Tommy voices his Theory on Marginally Improving Parenthood.
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The Romance of the Rickshaw


Original YT playout date: 16 October 2009
Duration: 34:46

The most romantic film on this channel this year.
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Take This Walcz


Original YT playout date: 13 December 2008
Duration: 33:50

Walcz (pronounced “vouch”) is the name of a pleasant Pomeranian town derived from the Kashubian word Wolcz and once called Deutsch Krone.

From there, we drive on to observe some more of the idyll that is the golden Polish autumn in the rolling forest roads of Pomerania.

The precise co-ordinates of the lovely woodland restaurant shown here are as follows:

geo:lat=53.422141645164224
geo:lon=16.387996673583984

I definitely recommend it.
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Huliganov’s Venice Experience #5/5 – In St Marco’s Square


Original YT playout date: 22 June 2008
Duration: 18:30

This vies with one or two others for the title of personal favorite of my travel videos. You’ll see why.
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Victor Berrjod’s excellent rebuttal of Bartosz Czekała’s hatchet piece against the GoldList Method


Thank you for your interest in the Goldlist Method! I see that your article contains a lot of misconceptions about it, so that even though your understanding of memory is accurate, you reach the wrong conclusion in the end. I’ll try to clear things up for you, since I have been using the GLM for many years and to great effect.

“But how do you know it’s effective? Is it actually based on any real science?”

This is a rhetorical question, but I will answer it anyway. You know it’s effective when it does what it is designed to do. And the GLM does do what it is designed to. And it is based on real science, namely on the forgetting curve. The two weeks are the core of the method; everything else is more or less optional.

“First of all, here is a great video which sums up what this method is all about.”

Christopher Huff’s video is indeed great, but it is intended as a tl;dr version of the full explanation, so it is good that you have included a link to a fuller explanation. However, it would have been even better if you had also included the link to David’s newly refined explanation so that readers could get it straight from the horse’s mouth. The new explanation seeks to clear up common misunderstandings that have become apparent and that he was not (and couldn’t have been) aware of when he first posted it.

“The author of the method maintains that:
1. The method allows you to retain up to thirty percent of the words in your long-term memory.”

This is only partly true. It isn’t the method itself that gives you a 30% retention rate. Rather, the method is based on the observation that, on average, people remember around 30% of the words after two weeks. This is illustrated by Ebbinghaus’s forgetting curve later in the article, so I will get back to this.

“2. It is also claimed that the process circumvents your short-term memory – you are expected to make no conscious effort to remember words. Thanks to this the information will be retained in your long-term memory.”

A better way to put it is that it is claimed that conscious memorization is discouraged because it is less effective for long-term retention (but indeed better for short-term retention). David does speak in terms of switching on and off memory functions, but he is not a memory scholar, so his hypotheses are not written in the standard academic terminology.
victorgun

“1. It doesn’t circumvent short-term memory
One of the big claims of this method is that it is able to circumvent your short-term memory. Somehow, thanks to it, you are able to place all the information straight in your long-term memory.”

Well, around 30% of it, and the method is based on the retention rczekalsate, not the other way around.

“In other words, initiation of consolidation is under conscious control and requires the use of central attention. The mere fact of looking at a piece of paper and reading/writing words activates it.”

That’s right, but remember that what David calls ‘short-term memory’ is not the same as ‘working memory’. In GLM terms, the long-term memory is everything you still remember after two weeks, and anything you didn’t remember for two weeks is considered to have been stored in the short-term memory. In standard academic terminology, both of these would be considered ‘long-term memory’.

“Next, the items you learn undergo working memory consolidation.
Working memory consolidation refers to the: transformation of transient sensory input into a stable memory representation that can be manipulated and recalled after a delay.
Contrary to what the creator of this method believes, after this process is complete, be it 2 weeks or more, the short-term memories are not gone. They are simply not easily accessible.”

In practical terms, it doesn’t really make much of a difference whether a memory is gone or you are unable to access it. The result is the same: you have forgotten it.

“You probably have experienced this phenomenon yourself many times. You learned something in the past. Then, after some years, you took it up again and were able to regain your ability relatively quickly. It was possible because your memories were still there. They just became “neuronally disconnected” and thus inaccessible.”

Indeed. This is what is called ‘activation’ in GLM terms.

“What’s more, the Ebbinghaus curve’s numbers are based on the assumption that the learned material :
– means nothing to you
– has no relevance to your life
– has no emotional load and meaning for you
On the curve, you can see that if you memorize information now and try to recall after 14 days, you will be able to retrieve about 21-23% of the previously memorized knowledge. Mind you that this is the knowledge which is incoherent, bears no emotional load and means nothing to you.”

Exactly. So when the words (or whatever else you want to remember) aren’t random, but part of a language you want to learn, we would expect this number to be somewhat higher. And it does indeed seem to be around 30% on average.

“What happens when you start manually writing down words which interest you or when you are able to establish some connection between them and your life? Well, this number can definitely go up.

Keep in mind that your recall rate will also be affected by:
– frequency of occurrence
– prior vocabulary knowledge
– cognateness.

So is there anything magical about the method and the number “30”?
Nope. It follows very precisely the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve which takes into account your short-term memory. Sometimes this number will be higher, sometimes it will be lower depending on your choice of words.”

That’s right. And this is what the GLM is based on.

“The Gold List Method is just a spaced repetition method with bigger intervals.”

That’s right, and for good reason. Normal spaced repetition systems try to catch words and bring them back as soon as you forget them, but by doing so, you end up reviewing a lot of words that you already know. In fact, based on the forgetting curve you probably know about 30% of the material essentially for life after having looked at it only once, and yet you will spend valuable study time reviewing it.

In the GLM system, you instead wait until you’ve forgotten all or almost all of what you won’t remember for life, and only then do your review. After two weeks, the forgetting curve is almost completely flat, so that is a good cut-off point.

“Even though the Gold List Method has initially the low activation energy, it starts growing considerably with each and every distillation.”

I’m sorry, what? Each distillation lessens it, if anything, because there are fewer lines for each distillation.

“Having to carry with you a couple of A4 notebooks seems also very impractical to me.”

The vast majority of distillations require only one book, and it does not have to be A4. Only the initial headlist and each transfer into a new book require more than one book.

“However, the biggest problem I have with this method in this department is that it suggests I only learn words I am interested in.”

No, it doesn’t mean that in the way you take it to mean. With any method you have to decide which words you are going to learn, e.g. all the words in your textbook, all the words of a certain frequency, etc. These words are the ones you want to learn, or in other words, the ones you are interested in learning.

“Good learning methods should work for any kind of vocabulary.s
And they should work particularly well for the vocabulary you’re interested in.”

Yeah, like the GLM. 🙂

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Uncle Davey’s Herts Content, #6 “Berkhamsted”


Original playout date: 1 March 2008
Duration: 8:26

One of my nicest galleries from a time I was doing my best to do as much walking as possible and used the camera to encourage that, even though it tended to slow progress right down. Read the rest of this entry

Huliganov’s Turkish Experience #11 – Fun with Fasil


Original playout date: 22 February 2008
Duration: 16:22

“Suyu gibi asiz ol!” This is another of my all time faves. With my good friends and colleagues from Istanbul. One of the evenings it would be so nice to go back and repeat.
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Huliganov’s Turkish Experience #9 – Architectural Turkish Delights!


Original playout date: 17 February 2008
Duration: 16:39

I remember this day in January 2016 as the first time I had walked a full 16 km since my youth. This corresponds o an early point in my now 11 year attempt to lose weight and gain strength in walking, which has been an up and down journey, but which has probably enabled me to live this long, as I was not in a good state before, unable to walk many kilometres, even just a few months prior to this.

Here are some of the lovey things I saw in the earlier part of that day after the church visit I had in the morning.
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Huliganov’s Finnish Experience #5 – Bleak Midwinter


Original playout date: 12 January 2008
Duration: 14:08

This is one of my personal favorites among the videos I have made. It contains two very beautiful pieces of music and on top of that the photographs I made with my new camera from America land. You can see the song with the unpronounceable name in the table below.
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On the Waterfront at Cape Town (South Africa Series 2/10)


Playout date: 12 November 2006
Camera: Fuji Finepix
Post Production: Windows Movie Maker – slight use
Location: Cape Town, South Africa, Victoria and Albert Waterfront
Other people featured: Performers on the waterfront
Genre: Walking with camera
Music used: “This could be heaven for everyone” by Queen – Karaoke version
Languages used: English with some singing in a Bantu language
Animals featured: Red wing starlings Onychognathus morio

This series, possibly beginning with this one, even though it is the 102nd video uploaded to YouTube, marks a certain development in the way I presented the video material. The cutting in of background music, the use of a common intro for series, the gallery shots with background music. This is an early prototype of about 2 or 3 hundred similarly style films from travel to different places. It’s not exactly the mode I settled into, but it’s well on the way there.

One thing I quite like about this one looking back is the attempt to use music in the backing track together with the ambient noises, like the drums of the waterfront performers here on the Victoria and Albert Waterfront in Cape Town. I have great memories of this place and would be happy to go to Cape Town again if ever I get the chance.

 

Apart from anything else, there were friendships made there which gave me a lot of value in my life. Just that alone, even if it had been nothing like the paradise it was, would have been well worth the trip.

RL101 – 5 Revision of the first 17 letters


With 171 likes to 3 dislikes at the time of posting this up to Huliganov.tv blog, this remains one of my most popular pieces. The revision of the first half of the Russian alphabet contains already a list of words, 31 in total, using the letters learned so far, unlike the previous lessons, which concentrated on letter only.

The joke “I spoil that woman” and the song Katiusha sung by myself and Elena have also elicited flattering comments from the viewership.

The word-list for this lesson is as follows, in alphabetical order of both languages:

адвокат lawyer café кафе
вот here is country страна
где where daddy папа
город town, city garden, orchard сад
да yes glass стакан
дерево tree he он
дом house, home here is вот
кафе café house, home дом
кот tomcat it оно
кто who juice сок
мама mother just, straight on просто
медсестра nurse lawyer адвокат
метро underground train mother мама
налево on the left no нет
направо on the right not не
не not nurse медсестра
нет no on the left налево
окно window on the right направо
он he she она
она she sister сестра
оно it soldier солдат
папа daddy there там
правда truth, true toilet туалет
просто just, straight on tomcat кот
сад garden, orchard town, city город
сестра sister tree дерево
сок juice truth, true правда
солдат soldier underground train метро
стакан glass where где
страна country who кто
там there window окно
туалет toilet yes да
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