Old Usenetposts Gallery #2 Tropical Birds


(I’m continuing with the repost of old material from the former Usenetposts.com)

Gallery Page 2 – Tropical Birds
Right, still with me? Good. We’re still looking at unidentified fauna. Here we have a kind of gull that I’ve never seen in Europe, with a kind of hairstyle, as it were, of an old English teacher of mine. (I use that possessive pronoun attributively, not possessively, as he would say). Provisionally, therefore, I’ve named it the Saunders gull – but what is its real name? E-mail or bulletin board if you know the answer. Seen in the Dominican Republic, Casa de Campo, November 2004.

This seagull is probably not new to science, but it was new to me

Again from the Dominican Republic in November 2004, is this small reddish hawk. The picture doesn’t deserve its own page, as the quality is not good, but still I don’t know the bird so I’m hoping someone will tell me what it is. This is the best of three I managed to take before it flew away.

The tiniest hawk I ever saw

More animals coming up, before moving on to other themes…

DJJ 13th February 2005

About David J. James

53 year old accountant who loves languages, literature, history, religion, politics, internet, vlogging and blogging and lively written discussion. Conservative Christian, married to an angel, we have three kids, and live in Warsaw, Poland. I can help you with company set-up, bookkeeping, payroll, tax, audit and due diligence all over Poland and the region.

Posted on 06/03/2012, in Birds and Mammals, Dominican Republic, Gallery style (showcases my photos) and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. I think the “seagulls” are Royal Terns and the small “hawk” could be an American Kestrel.

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  2. Rose Walker

    I cannot identify the seagulls in your photos. However, if no one else provides an answer, may I suggest your contacting the Cornell Lab of Ornithology? You may find this database useful: http://www.megabytedata1.co.uk/MB064u/index.asp This is a multilingual dictionary of European birds.

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