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Is Poland considered a bad country? Why?

 

If someone has a low view of Poland, it usually means one of four things.

1. Ignorance

They don’t know Poland and have not spent time here. Maybe they don’t know Polish or have only a tiny grasp and cannot get over the cultural nuances. This is typical of ex-pats with little to offer who populate Facebook groups in order to grumble about the host nation, in comments laced with spelling mistakes, poor vocabulary and grammatical howlers in their own language. What hope had they to contribute much to Polish society? Their role here is only to embarrass the more elevated ex-patriate community and to get on their nerves by failing to observe rules.

In Poland for instance, fewer than two-thirds of the registered British community have bothered to sort out their withdrawal agreement documentation in the year they had in which to do so.  A further group of UK people and other Anglosphere people in Poland are simply here using money they saved in the UK or have some

Poland, a paradise for those who know how to appreciate it.

informal ways of making money, and are not actually registered anywhere at all. In some cases they even run vehicles which are likewise unregistered. None of which stops them from whinging on about the host nation in a way that makes most of us simply hang our heads.

 

2. Grass is greener-ness

They could be Poles who buy into the optimism about other countries but who never went there.

The majority of Poles going abroad to work miss home and come home. The most famous Polish poem starts with the sentiment that this country (Mickiewicz codenames it Lithuania to stay out of trouble) is only truly appreciated by those who have left it.

 

3. Neo-Marxist pseudo-fragilities

They might be leftist people with a jaundiced view of the influence of a conservative Church in the politics of the country. Such people are able easily to move to other European countries with left leaning governments who cannot wait to erode the Christian heritage, but don’t call Poland bad if it wants to buck that trend, and thankfully we are not the only ones.

 

4. General Uselessness

They could be people unable to give much to society and who need to live from social welfare who do not get that much support here. This is why the refugees we already took ran back to Germany one night. This is something the government are working on but in business I can tell you the improvements to welfare have a negative impact on cheap labour. So there are people who could work but who are low-skilled persons who now live on benefits as people do in the West, but thankfully at much lower levels.

 

Conclusion

There is clearly an overlap between these 4 conditions. A person can, in theory (and also usually in practice), be both a butt-hurt Neo-Marxist and generally useless both at the same time. But for the sake of having a list, I have separated them out. The internet loves lists.

Poland is not helped by the presence of malcontents, whether home-grown or imported. I do however have good news, the borders, other than closures due to Coronavirus restrictions or in defence against hybrid warfare (yes, I added that since 2017, but if Jeremy Clarkson can do that, so can I), tend to be open, so if you do not like it, escape should not be too challenging, even for you.

Now stick your thumbs down under the article and see if I care.

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